Wine score sheet | How to take wine tasting notes

The wine score sheet allow us to capture tastes, comments and to push our wine analysis a step further while doing a wine tasting.

Vinivino wine review tool is build to capture the essential elements of each different wine tasting steps. Each wine review entered by you or by other Vinivino members are accessible anytime. You keep track of your wine journal and can refer to it at any moment.

The first step while doing a wine review is to gather the wine bottle information. You will be asked to fill that section if the wine is not already listed in our database.


Bottle information

Name: wine name

Region: wine appellation

Varietal: variety of grape, e.g. Cabernet Sauvignon, Pinot Noir, etc..
Use the “+” if the wine you are reviewing has more than 1 varietal

Country: country of origin

Winery: vineyard, wine producer

Category: define the type of wine

Vintage: the year in which the grapes have been harvested. Leave it blank if the wine you are reviewing is not vintage

Alcohol %: the percentage of alcohol

This wine is available in my region
Please select if you can buy the wine via the normal facilities in place in your region




How to read a wine label

Please refer to the following image example




The second step is the wine tasting review.
Three senses come into play during a wine tasting: sight, smell and taste. Remember, there is no right or false answer… it’s about your tastes!



How wine looks – sight
Use a white background to view the wine, white is neutral and will prevent mistaking the real color. The appearance of a wine can yield a lot of information.

First, look at the color of the wine. White wine will be greenish, pale yellow or golden. Red wine will be clear like rosé, purple, ruby or dark red. Rosé will be blue-gray, purple-rosé or light red.

After, verify the clarity of the wine, it’s transparency. To verify the viscosity, stir the wine and look for the trace on the inside of the glass. Viscosity determines the alcohol. The intensity is the color intensity.



How wine smells

Place your glass close to your nose and not your nose close to your glass, i.e. keep your head and body straight. It will help you to take a better sniff and it will also maximize the surface area of wine in contact with the air. The interface between wine and air will release the aromas. After the first sniff, agitate your wine; it will also release new aromas. Never fill your glass too full; it will hold you from swirling effectively. Watch the curve of your wine glass, the curve normally tells you where to stop filling your glass.

Harder the aromas are to identify when smelling, more complex the nose of the wine is.

Aromas family (tags) Select within these main categories and refine you aromas notes by specifying your own tags in the open fields.

Here are few examples for the aromas family:

Barnyard: venison, leather, stable (present in some old red wines)
Balsamic: smell of perfume such as vanilla, incense and resin
Woody: smell of oak barrel
Flinty: burned, cooked, smoked, toast, caramel, gunflint, rubber, cocoa and coffee
Spicy: cinnamon, basil, thyme, nutmeg, pepper, mint…
Floral: smell of flowers
Fruity: smell of fruits
Mineral: chalk, limestone, earth, dust and sulphur
Vegetable: grass, leaves and greenery
Etherized: nail polish, alcohol and fermentation



How wine tastes

There are four tastes that can be distinguished by your tongue: sweet, salty, acid and sour. The sweet is perceptible on the extremity of the tongue and generates thick saliva. The salty is perceptible on the sides of the tongue and generates saliva. The acid is perceptible on the sides, right on the top of the salty and generates voluminous saliva. Lastly, the sour is perceptible on the back of the tongue and generates a certain aftertaste.

As when you were looking the wine, tasting the wine can yield a lot of information such as where the wine is from, the varietal used, the age of the wine, etc…

Flavor family (tags) Select within these main categories and refine you flavor notes by specifying your own tags in the open fields.

Here are few examples of flavors family:

Barnyard: venison, leather, stable (present in some old red wines)
Balsamic: taste of perfume such as vanilla, incense and resin
Woody: oak barrel
Flinty: burned, cooked, smoked, toast, caramel, gunflint, rubber, cocoa and coffee
Spicy: cinnamon, basil, thyme, nutmeg, pepper, mint…
Floral: taste of flowers
Fruity: taste of fruits
Mineral: chalk, limestone, earth, dust or sulphur
Vegetable: grass, leaves and greenery
Etherized: nail polish, alcohol and fermentation



Tasting notes
Enter additional notes such as wine glass used for your tasting, your feeling while tasting…

Wine & food pairing
Which meal will make the perfect harmony with this wine…

Your rating
How do you rate this wine: score the wine against your own tastes and preferences.




How to score a wine on the 100-point scale (from 50 to 100)?

99-100 Points
A GREAT wine! This wine is part of the best!

96-98 Points
An outstanding wine. Definitely a superior wine that you will remember and talk for a long time.

92-95 Points
An excellent wine. You will keep asking for this wine. This wine rocks!

90-91 Points
Now, we are talking! A very good wine which charmed you.

85-89 Points
A very good wine. However, it does not surpass the 90-point mark.

80-84 Points
A good wine

70-79 Points
A drinkable average wine. Improvements welcome.

60-69 Points
Most likely undrinkable.

50-59 Points
Not recommended. This wine is undrinkable.



Have a great wine tasting! Go to our homepage >



Cheers!








Image credit (glass of wine): Mark Dotson




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About the Author


Guy-Jacques Langevin

Co-founder of Vinivino. His passion for wine started for over a decade. Guy-Jacques followed wine teaching courses from sommelier François Chartier and from the Société des Alcools du Québec (SAQ) in addition to attending various wine tasting events. He founded Vinivino with the goal of bringing the wine accessible to everyone.

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